My Greek Tools

Regardless of your level of Greek instruction (beginning, intermediate, advanced), I hope you will find something useful on this page. Most of the links are to Amazon.com.
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Here's what you will find on this page:

Beginning Greek
Intermediate Greek
Advanced Greek
Greek Exegesis
New Testament Interpretation
New Testament Textual Criticism
The Gospels
Pauline Studies
The Christian Life/Missions
Interviews
DBO Essays about Greek
Articles, Essays, and Other Works
PowerPoint Presentations
Complete List of Publications

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Beginning Greek

Learn to Read New Testament Greek
This is a link to my introductory Greek Grammar, Learn to Read New Testament Greek.

Reviews (from Amazon):
"For anyone who is trying to learn Greek but is not already a linguistics expert this book is written for you. It divides the language into easy to swallow lessons that gradually brings you through an introductory course."

"David Alan Black has provided us with an introductory grammar that is a model of clarity. This NT Greek grammar is reasonably concise and yet always provides sufficient information for the student to grasp the matter at hand. Compared to 'The Basics of Biblical Greek', this grammar does a better job of introducing the student to the syntax (on an elementary level) of the New Testament with clearer explanations of grammatical terminology. . . . This is a 'must have' resource for first year Koine Greek students - and is well worth a second look by instructors who have chosen other texts."

"Throughout his book, Black came across as a master-teacher making the path as easy as possible for his students to travel."
Here are eight helpful resources pertaining to my introductory grammar:
The first is a PowerPoint flashcard program using Bible Works vocabulary links. The vocabulary for my grammar is ready for download as .pdf and .ppt files.
The second resource is Jacob Cerone's Quizlet page, which has a set of flash cards for my beginning Greek grammar.
The third resource is a complete list of vocabulary for all my Greek classes developed by Jacob Cerone. This includes the vocabulary for my Learn to Read New Testament Greek (Greek 1 & 2), Metzger's vocabulary (Greek Syntax and Exegesis), Philippians (Intermediate Exegesis), and LXX. Click here for the .zip file. These flashcards can be loaded onto the Vocab Pro application for iPod, iPhone, iPad. For a detailed explanation on how to install the vocabulary files to your Apple device and additional vocabulary files, go here.
The fourth resource is Danny Zacharias' Greek Flash Black Edition flashcard app (Mac). 
The fifth resource is audio for the Greek vocabulary from lessons 1-7 (excluding chapter 2). Chapter 1; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 6; and Chapter 7.
The sixth resource is a parsing guide for all the exercises in my Learn to Read New Testament Greek developed by Jacob Cerone.
The seventh resource is a workbook with supplemental exercises that includes "1300 Greek to English/English to Greek sentences, more than 700 drilling exercises to reinforce the foundational principles of Greek grammar, and many other helpful learning resources for introductory Greek students." It is designed to be used along with the third edition of Learn to Read New Testament Greek.
The eighth resource is a worksheet with extra questions that will give you practice with some of the concepts in my grammar.
Spanish Edition of Learn to Read New Testament Greek
This is a link to my introductory Greek Grammar in Spanish, Aprenda a Leer el Griego del Nuevo Testamento. It is also available in Google Play and iBooks formats.


 

 



Jacob Cerone's Quizlet page has a set of flash cards for the Spanish version of my beginning Greek grammar.
Greek DVDs
This 24 DVD set records me teaching New Testament Greek using my introductory Greek grammar. The classes were taught in English even though they were recorded before a live audience in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Intermediate Greek

It's Still Greek to Me: An Easy-to-Understand Guide to Intermediate Greek
In this book I've tried to write an easy-to-use guide to intermediate Greek. I apologize in advance for all the nurdy jokes.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“Once a student finishes the first year of Biblical Greek, there are three ‘Intermediate’ grammars that should be read: Dan Wallace’s ‘Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics’, Dana and Mantey, and this book by David Alan Black. Without any question, you should read Black's book first. First of all, ‘It's Still Greek to Me’ is just plain fun to read (which is not something that can be said of very many grammar books!). Yet, all the wit and excellent writing are not merely to entertain - but reveal Prof. Black as a genuine master teacher who makes NT Greek grammar not only clear but memorable. For students who are just finishing their first year of Greek, this book should be started as soon as you turn in your last paper for the semester - and definitely before you begin your second year of Greek or your first NT exegesis course. . . . Highly recommended.”

“I had Dave Black for elementary Greek and used his ‘Learn to Read New Testament Greek.’ I took another professor for intermediate Greek, and we used Dan Wallace's book. I bought this anyway, and couldn't be more grateful. The material is much the same, but the explanations are much more comprehensible. Black can cover in 3-4 pages what Wallace would in 20-30, and you actually understand what you are dealing with. Furthermore, Black doesn't beat you in the head with over the top technicalities. Bottom line, while there may be other grammars which are helpful, this is the book that opened my understanding of intermediate Greek and enabled me to succeed in the class.”
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Advanced Greek

Linguistics for Students of New Testament Greek: A Survey of Basic Concepts and Applications
This book introduces Greek students to the field of linguistics and shows you how its findings can increase your understanding of the New Testament.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“New Testament (Koine) Greek has long been taught as just another dead language. Black, an experienced teacher of Greek, changes the paradigm. Applying modern linguistic theory, Black shows how many of the so-called irregularities of Greek are actually normal and regular. The book covers the gamut: phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, etc. Each section concludes with a short bibliography which can help students and teachers learn even more about linguistics and Koine Greek. An important text for newcomers and a useful review of Greek to sharpen rusty skills.”

“Dr. Black makes an otherwise dry subject interesting.”

“Black invites the reader to apply the techniques of modern linguistics to the analysis of New Testament Greek. This excellent general introduction covers the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and historical linguistics of koine Greek. It assumes no Greek or linguistics background. . . . Highly recommended. Although it covers a lot of ground, the explanations are short and to the point and examples abound. A delightful 172 pages that would lay a great foundation for someone contemplating linguistics as a major or who wants to conscientiously apply a knowledge of koine to NT interpretation.”
Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Discourse Analysis
This is an introduction to Greek discourse analysis with special emphasis on its practical application to the language of the New Testament. Part I of the book introduces some fundamental principles of discourse analysis. Part II analyzes the discourse features of selected New Testament texts.

Review (from Amazon):
“This book contains selected papers from a 1991 conference sponsored by Wycliffe Bible Translators. Its editors are David A. Black, Katharine Barnwell and Stephen Levinsohn and there is also a foreword by Eugene Nida. . . . Overall, I found this book to be educational and useful for those wishing to understand or rightly exegete Holy Scripture. Of course, there are points at which one might disagree with some explanation of a particular verse or even take issue with the methodology employed by those who contributed essays to this book. Nevertheless, I think that this work deserves to be read and pondered.”
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Greek Exegesis

Using New Testament Greek in Ministry: A Practical Guide for Students and Pastors
In this book I walk you through using your knowledge of New Testament Greek in exegesis. Whether you are fresh out of your introductory Greek courses or have not touched your Greek New Testament since seminary, this book will help you use the language in teaching preparation.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“David Black has such a pastoral heart and it shows in all his writings. He makes Greek come to life and drives in the purpose behind it.”

“This is a very short, practical, down to earth and concise guide to exegesis. You can read this book through in one hour. It begins (ch1) with what the book is about and how Greek can enhance the sermons or study for the pastor or student at work then it proceeds (ch2) to selecting the right tools for doing exegesis e.g. which commentaries to use, using the computer, background studies etc. then we go to the heart of the book in chapters 3 and 4 a very practical how to on doing exegesis, these two chapters are the best part of the book in my opinion. The final chapter in the book is VERY short. It’s a guideline for you to use when doing your own exegesis. For people like me who don't always have a lot of time this book is really handy and excellent resource.”
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New Testament Interpretation

The New Testament: Its Background and Message
In this book, Tommy Lea and I have tried to produce a clear and concise introduction to the New Testament.This book is somewhat unique in that it combines an introduction and a survey.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“This book is a great expository tool for anyone wanting to learn more about the New Testament. It provides history, background, maps, and good information behind the authorship of every book of the New Testament. I would recommend it for any seminarian or lay person just interested in learning more about God's word.”

“I bought this book for a class at Liberty University. I was surprised at the easy to read writing style. This is one of my favorite books from my Master's in Theology program. I graduated in 2013 and still use it from time to time. I recommend this for anyone—you don't have to be in seminary to benefit from this book.”
Interpreting the New Testament: Essays on Methods and Issues
This is a sequel to New Testament Criticism and Interpretation. David Dockery and I present essays on current issues and methods with the purpose of enhancing New Testament interpretation, teaching, and preaching.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“This is a very good introduction to a wide variety of issues related to the interpretation of the New Testament. The topics range from methodology: textual criticism, source criticism, and form criticism etc. to issues such as background studies, the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament, and the utilization of modern linguistics in biblical interpretation. There are also useful summaries on interpreting the Pauline Epistles, The Gospel of John, The Book of Revelation, and other New Testament books. The authors represent the best in New Testament scholarship – names like Darrell Bock, Scot McKnight, Thomas Schreiner, and Gary Burge to name a few. Overall, this is a very helpful book and makes for a nice read for undergraduates and seminarians. The authors hold to a high view of the Bible and make many insightful comments. For example, the authors point out that one can benefit from many of the critical and literary interpretative methodologies if one uses discretion and is careful not to imbibe unbiblical presuppositions (cf. Darrell Bock for example).”

“Many thanks for all the work done in research - most impressed with thoroughness and credibility of this very impressive book.”
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New Testament Textual Criticism

New Testament Textual Criticism: A Concise Guide
This book is a concise companion to Brotzman's Old Testament Textual Criticism. It introduces the fundamentals of New Testament textual criticism and helps you learn how to make decisions based on the internal and external evidence.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“What is textual criticism? Why is it necessary? How should it be done? At eighty pages (of large type), Black's introduction to New Testament textual criticism can be read in a single sitting and provides answers to these questions. Black introduces the reader (any reader) to the various manuscripts underlying the New Testament and presents the different perspectives on textual criticism. As stated in the preface, "this volume attempts to make the findings of scholarship accessible to a wide readership. Nothing in this book is taken for granted. Every term, every problem, is explained clearly, concisely, and 'from scratch'." I certainly found this to be true. The first two chapters discuss the need for textual criticism and the different approaches to the task. The final chapter provides a few examples to help the reader understand some of the issues faced by textual critics as they try to determine the original Greek text behind the New Testament. The bibliography gives you a number of additional reading suggestions to move beyond "A Concise Guide". If you are simply a lay person as I am, reading this book will allow you to have a better understanding of why some Bibles occasionally offer footnotes containing alternate translations. Black's book will also give you a better understanding of the history behind the New Testament scriptures and how they have been preserved from the apostles' time to our own.”

“The operative word here is "concise." In less than 80 pages of large print, the author leads the person with no previous knowledge to a basic understanding. Black gives attention to such matters as writing in the ancient world, the various witnesses to the text of the New Testament, principles of textual criticism, and the differing modern approaches to the task. Also included are sections on how to read the technical apparatuses in the two most popular editions of the Greek New Testament (United Bible Society and Nestle-Aland), and a worksheet for making text-critical decisions. This is likely the best book available for introducing students of the Greek New Testament to the basics of textual criticism. Advanced students can use it to quickly brush up on their knowledge and skill, and ministers can recommend it to people who ask about marginal readings and "missing verses" in their Bibles. This is a first-rate guidebook that deserves five stars.”
Rethinking New Testament Textual Criticism
Leading scholars survey the discipline and present three current approaches to determining the text of the New Testament.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“This is an excellent book that tries to fairly portray the three major streams of N.T. Textual Criticism: Reasoned Eclecticism, Thoroughgoing Eclecticism, and Byzantine Priority. Eldon Jay Epp writes an extensive introduction and talks about some of the main issue facing modern textual criticism. He is followed by Michael Holmes who presents the case for Reasoned Eclecticism. Then J.K Elliott argues for Thoroughgoing Eclecticism, and Maurice Robinson sublimely conveys the Byzantine Priority point of view. Moises Silva consummates the book with a tongue in cheek critique of the all of the views presented, making no apologies for his own bias in doing so. All in all, an excellent book, Epps article was especially engaging, and I'm afraid the dust is still settling in my attic. This book is definitely worth the price.”

“Compiled and edited by David Alan Black, (Professor of New Testament and Greek, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) Rethinking New Testament Textual Criticism is a selection of essays by five learned authors concerning interpretations of the New Testament and the various methods to determine the original text among conflicting readings. . . . Enhanced with both a Subject Index and a Scripture Index, Rethinking New Testament Textual Criticism is a work of confidently recommended scholarship and a welcome contribution to Christian Studies reference collections and reading lists.”
Scribes and Scripture: New Testament Essays in Honor of J. Harold Greenlee
This Festschrift is addressed to anyone who is interested in what J. Harold Greenlee has exemplified so well through forty-five years of teaching and writing: vivere et studere ad maiorem Dei gloriam.
Key Issues in New Testament Criticism (Audio Series)
In this series I provide insight for how to interpret and respond to important issues raised by New Testament Textual Criticism.
Perspectives on the Ending of Mark
Because it is conspicuously absent from more than one early Greek manuscript, the final section of the gospel of Mark (16:9-20) that details Christ’s resurrection remains a constant source of debate among serious students of the New Testament. This book presents in counterpoint form the split opinions about this difficult passage with a goal of determining which is more likely. Maurice Robinson and I argue for the verses’ authenticity. Keith Elliott and Daniel Wallace contend that they are not original to Mark’s gospel. Darrell Bock responds to each view and summarizes the state of current research on the entire issue.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“If you would like to get current on the state of scholarship on the long ending of Mark, this is the introduction you want. Highly readable, this volume does not bolster your presuppositions, but alerts you to the important arguments on all sides of the debate regarding Mark's long ending (and the intermediate ending). This book is a great introduction for those just jumping into the debate and a good review and update for those who have previously studied the textual issue of Mark's long ending.”

“The four essays and one response contained in this volume were informative, concise, edifying and accessible. As a pastor who aims to preach every verse and word of scripture, it is vital to understand the nature of the text you preach or teach. The strengths of this book were fourfold. First, the contributors believed that the chief purpose of textual criticism is to gain access to the wording and order of the original manuscripts. Secondly, all five contributors represented the entire spectrum of scholarly opinion on this subject, thus making for a stronger and more interesting read. Thirdly, the closing essay by Dr. Darrell Bock summarized the four contributing essays with precision and accessible insight. Then fourthly, the vast end notes at the end of each essay enables the reader to dig further and get a sample of the relevant findings of scholarship on this issue.”
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The Gospels

Rethinking the Synoptic Problem
This book's primary goal is to familiarize students with the main positions held by New Testament scholars in this much-debated area of research. The contributors to this volume, all leading biblical scholars, highlight current academic trends within New Testament scholarship and update evangelical understandings of the Synoptic Problem.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“The different views expressed in this volume are indispensable when analyzing the synoptic problem. . . . Black and Beck provide perhaps the best evangelical analysis of the major views along with sufficient examples from each proposed solution.”

“If a person wants to complete deep research into who wrote and what order the Synoptic Gospels were written, this is just what you need.”
Why Four Gospels?
In this succinct treatment of the Synoptic Problem, I have attempted to provide a new look at the Markan priority debate regarding the historical origins of the gospel writings and offer in its place the "fourfold gospel hypothesis." By taking into account data within the gospels themselves and evidence from the early church fathers, I affirm the traditional view that Matthew was the first gospel written and suggest that Luke was written as its Gentile counterpart. Peter, whose recollections form the basis of Mark, provided the apostolic stamp of approval for Luke's gospel by drawing from both prior sources and bridging the gap between the two books. This book is also available in Google Play and iBooks formats.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“Dr. Black's book brings to light the holes and weaknesses within the Markan priority thesis. It would seem, at the outset, that so many people for the past two centuries have considered this thesis to be truth. When, in actuality, they are making the origin of the Gospels much more complex than need be. . . . Dr. Black's book brings a refreshing look at the Synoptic problem, which in turn, is not a problem at all. When faced with the evidence of literature, history, the patristic fathers, and the incredible amount of material from the earliest times of church history, his conclusion about the order of Matthew, Luke, then Mark makes sense. This is an incredible book, can be used and read by people of all backgrounds, although pastors, teachers, and Bible students will probably find it the most useful. This should become the normal textbook when discussing and introducing the origin of the Gospels.”

“I applaud Professor Black's work. This is a book written for a lay audience but welcome to professional scholars and theologians who have not felt comfortable with the tenuous theories put forth among academia since the Enlightenment eschewed the supernatural and ignored church Fathers and tradition as being irrelevant.”
Here is a video review by Dima Kotik:



Perspectives on the Ending of Mark
Because it is conspicuously absent from more than one early Greek manuscript, the final section of the gospel of Mark (16:9-20) that details Christ’s resurrection remains a constant source of debate among serious students of the New Testament. This book presents in counterpoint form the split opinions about this difficult passage with a goal of determining which is more likely. Maurice Robinson and I argue for the verses’ authenticity. Keith Elliott and Daniel Wallace contend that they are not original to Mark’s gospel. Darrell Bock responds to each view and summarizes the state of current research on the entire issue.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“If you would like to get current on the state of scholarship on the long ending of Mark, this is the introduction you want. Highly readable, this volume does not bolster your presuppositions, but alerts you to the important arguments on all sides of the debate regarding Mark's long ending (and the intermediate ending). This book is a great introduction for those just jumping into the debate and a good review and update for those who have previously studied the textual issue of Mark's long ending.”

“The four essays and one response contained in this volume were informative, concise, edifying and accessible. As a pastor who aims to preach every verse and word of scripture, it is vital to understand the nature of the text you preach or teach. The strengths of this book were fourfold. First, the contributors believed that the chief purpose of textual criticism is to gain access to the wording and order of the original manuscripts. Secondly, all five contributors represented the entire spectrum of scholarly opinion on this subject, thus making for a stronger and more interesting read. Thirdly, the closing essay by Dr. Darrell Bock summarized the four contributing essays with precision and accessible insight. Then fourthly, the vast end notes at the end of each essay enables the reader to dig further and get a sample of the relevant findings of scholarship on this issue.”
The Pericope of the Adulteress in Contemporary Research
This is an exciting new book edited by myself and my former assistant, Jacob Cerone. The chapters are from a conference held at the campus of SEBTS in the spring of 2014 (Jacob blogged about it here). Here is a description from the publisher's website: "The contributors to this volume (J.D. Punch, Jennifer Knust, Tommy Wasserman, Chris Keith, Maurice Robinson, and Larry Hurtado) re-examine the Pericope Adulterae (John 7.53-8.11) asking afresh the question of the paragraph's authenticity. Each contributor not only presents the reader with arguments for or against the pericope's authenticity but also with viable theories on how and why the earliest extant manuscripts omit the passage."
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Pauline Studies

Paul, Apostle of Weakness
In this book I examine every occurrence of astheneia and its cognates in the Pauline Epistles, both in their immediate contexts and in their relation to Pauline thought as a whole. The Pauline weakness motif is then summarized, with the conclusion that the concept of weakness is foundational to Paul's anthropology, Christology, and ethics.

Review (from Amazon):
“It is only when we study what the Bible, in particular the apostle Paul, has to say about weakness that we discover what it means to the follower of Christ. Into this study comes the revised edition of Dr. David Alan Black's work Paul, Apostle of Weakness. This is an important entry into the study of Paul's writing on a critical topic for conversation in the church. . . . All in all, a very challenging book both because of the counter-cultural nature of the topic as well as the more complex than average writing level but it is also a worthwhile use of your time. Weakness as a submission to God is not being a weakling but rather a discovery of the source of our truest strength, reliance on God who is all sufficient. Check out Paul, Apostle of Weakness to aid your study of this never ending fountain of true strength!”
The Authorship of Hebrews: The Case for Paul
In this adaptation of two articles I wrote for Faith and Mission, I re-examine both the internal and external evidence for the authorship of Hebrews. I conclude on basis of the church's early attribution of the epistle to Paul and linguistic affinities between the epistle and other Pauline writings, that it is more than likely that Paul authored the epistle.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“A pastor once told me that anyone who can read Greek can see that Paul did not write Hebrews. In fact, about the only thing scholars can agree on about the authorship of Hebrews is that it was not Paul. Yet David Alan Black, a professor of NT Greek for 30 years, systematically undercut the assumptions that this consensus is built upon. Black uses his extensive knowledge of the Greek language, the NT text, and linguistics to amass a considerable amount of evidence to support his case, and it is clear that this is but a summary. The first part focuses on internal evidence and uses example after example to show how the use of words, phrases and style have parallels to the writings of Paul. The second part deals with the external evidence, the testimony of the early fathers. I like books that challenge “accepted conclusions” in a clear and intelligent way. Black certainly does that. Even if in the end he does not persuade you, he will give you a lot to think about.”

“While most modern scholars admit that they do not know who wrote the book of Hebrews, they are almost unanimous that it COULD NOT have been Paul. David A. Black goes against this consensus opinion, arguing for the book to be genuinely Pauline, though possibly physically written by Luke. In this short work, he examines and critiques the basic arguments against Pauline authorship, as well as the evidence supporting it. Well worth the time to read and digest his reasonings, and a great price also.”
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The Christian Life/Missions

Christian Archy
What does it mean to be part of the kingdom of God? This questions should occupy the mind of every Christian. In this book I examine the New Testament to find the truly radical and all-encompassing claims of God's kingdom. In doing so, it becomes clear that the character of this kingdom is widely different from what is commonly contemplated today. Its glory is revealed only through suffering--a point that Jesus' disciples, then and now, have been slow to understand. Christ's claim to our total allegiance is one we seek to avoid at all costs. But there is only one way to victory and peace, and that way is the way of the Lamb.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It was challenging and certainly eye-opening for me as a pastor/elder to read. There are so many things that we have allowed into our churches that are absolutely un-Biblical. I am very grateful for Dr. Black's honest insight and perspective and for his courage to share the truth about how our churches must return to building Christ's kingdom instead of our own.”

“As a pastor I was thoroughly encouraged by this book as it reminded me of the goal toward which we should be pressing despite the plethora of current erroneous ecclesiology. Many concepts have become the sine qua non of evangelical Christianity, such as the necessity of homeschooling, the necessity of combating terrorists, the necessity of spreading democracy, the necessity of avoiding noticeable sins like smoking and drinking, and the necessity of upholding the traditions of each respective church. Dr. Black refocuses our attention upon what matters most; namely the Gospel and its proliferation throughout the nations. Dr. Black reminds us that it is not our job to legislate or control morality in the world, but it is our job to share the gospel. Consequently the gospel will transform the morality of the world by grace. Law has never been able to change behavior and therefore it is strange that the religious right would rely so much upon legislation. This book is a plea to return to biblical Christianity; Christianity that treasures and proclaims that Jesus died for us and consequently that we should take up our crosses and follow Him.”
It's All Greek to Me: Confessions of an Unlikely Academic
I wrote this book as an autobiography of my academic journey. Ever wonder how a boy from Hawaii become a Basel graduate and professor of Greek, and why I still teach Greek after all these years? You will find the answers in these pages.
La Historia de Mi Vida (Spanish Edition)
La Historia de mi Vida por Becky Lynn Black no es la autobiografía de una celebridad. Es algo mucho mejor. La historia de Becky es un testimonio. Y el poder llegar a ser vencedores a través de la palabra de nuestro testimonio es una promesa (Apocalipsis 12:12). Un testimonio no solo se trata de una historia que satisface la curiosidad. Un testimonio presenta un llamado divino. La historia en este libro te llamará a poner a Dios en primer lugar, especialmente en tu matrimonio. Te llamará a las misiones. De hecho, este testimonio es la historia del Evangelio. Dios te ama, murió para salvarte y te llama a que te unas a Él en el ministerio de la reconciliación. No importa a donde vayas o cuales sean los problemas que enfrentes, pues Dios estará contigo. El no removerá todas tus dificultades, pero Él trabajará a través de ti de una forma u otra. Cuando Becky Lynn Black partió a su hogar en el Cielo, no fue una victoria del cáncer que trató de vencerla. Esto fue una victoria de Dios sobre la muerte, manifestada en la vida de Su sierva.
My Life Story: by Becky Black
Before her passing, my wife Becky dictated her autobiography. She tells of the adventures she had in Ethiopia, her early years, her marriage to me, and her return to the mission field. One theme permeates these pages: Christ-centered living.

Review (from Amazon):
“Becky's autobiography will grip you from page one. She walks you through her life and shows you what it looks like to walk with ‘the God who has been my shepherd all my life to this day’ (Gen. 48:15). Becky's autobiography says exactly what Jacob said in verse 15. My wife Lesly and I cried when we read this book. We, of course, knew MamaB (that's what we called her), and we were close. But you know what? Work through the pages of this book and you'll see the Becky we knew. You'll see the godly woman who modeled for us what it looked like to follow obediently after the one who gave his life for us on the cross. You'll see the one who was resolved from an early age to live for the sake of the gospel. Purpose? Becky had it. Love? Becky gave it. Wisdom? Yep, and lots of it. This book tells the story of a God who uses everyday people to do extraordinary things. And extraordinary they were.”
Seven Marks of a New Testament Church: A Guide for Christians of All Ages
What were the distinctive marks of an early New Testament church? Acts 2:37–47 has a list of seven aspects: evangelistic preaching, christian baptism, apostolic preaching, genuine relationships, Christ-centered gatherings, fervent prayer, and sacrificial living. Does your church look like a New Testament church?

Reviews (from Amazon):
“This was a fantastic read. Black voiced a lot of the same thoughts and concerns I've been wrestling with about the institutional church. It's encouraging to see these ideas coming from an academic and in a form that is easy for every believer to access. I especially appreciated his arguments for unity among the church, particularly in regards to decision-making. "[O]ur man-made method of decision-making... undermines the example of the early church. ... We vote, and leave an aggrieved minority. The early church waited upon the Spirit, and it produced a unified whole" (Location 596). His comments on the Lord's Supper are also excellent: "Other forms of communion (broken crackers and tiny cups), while perhaps more practical, fail to give significance to the importance Paul attached to the oneness aspect of the Supper." I started this book a bit skeptical since it was written by a seminary professor, but I was pleasantly surprised that Black set aside the filter of how-it's-always-been-done and compares church institutions to what is found in the New Testament.”

“There are no lack of books on the topic of the church. Most, and I say this with no hesitation, are garbage and consist of feel-good malarkey and repackaged business wisdom applied to religious organizations. It was therefore a welcome change to read Dr. David Black's newest work from Energion Publications, Seven Marks of a New Testament Church. . . . Top down leadership and top down centered ecclesiology is great for creating top heavy organizations but for the church we need to flip that order around as Dr. Black has done here. . . . [Seven Marks of a New Testament Church] is a book I can unreservedly recommend for anyone studying the church, whether one is seeking to reform an existing group and starting a new group from scratch. It is not long and it tends to raise a lot of questions, making it perfect as a study guide or introduction to ecclesiology. Get a copy, read it and then pass a copy or three on to your church friends. They might be surprised by what they read!”
The Gospel According To Four Women
Dr. David Black presents "The Gospel According To Four Women" at Calvary Chapel West Oahu on July 13, 2014:



The Jesus Paradigm
I've written this book for anyone who is dissatisfied with cultural Christianity and who longs for a greater reality in the whole Body of Christ. What does it look like to really follow Jesus Christ? The answer I found is that following Christ means living sacrificially, just like him.

Reviews (from Amazon):
“All in all, this is an excellent book. Well written, accessible, challenging, reasonable for the most part. There is no higher compliment that I can give a book than to say it was challenging to me, made me want to read the Scriptures more diligently and that I marked pages and quotes liberally. This book did all three. It is a book that should and will challenge people to look at the assumptions we have about our walk as Christians, our view of the church and our status as redeemed sheep. Most importantly, this is a book that, as Alan Knox puts it, is strictly about discipleship and being a disciple of Christ involves a lot more than Sunday school, membership in a local church and dropping some money in the offering plate. It is a whole-life commitment. I hope that many Christians pick up this book, read it and examine themselves. I think the church will be far healthier if we focus on a life that is mission minded and Gospel centered, a life of discipleship that goes beyond theological camps and doctrinal triumphalism, and that sets aside public displays of religious piety for quiet service.”

“On one hand, Black's book is an academic work. His years of study in Greek, New Testament, hermeneutics, and history are ably demonstrated in this work. On the other hand, this book stands apart from many works of academia, because Black is unable (and does not desire to) separate this work from his life. In fact, he uses examples from his own work in the seminary in North Carolina, at his home in Virginia, and in countless villages and cities around the world - especially in Ethiopia - to exhort his readers to consider their beliefs and live them out! I have to admit that I did not first come across these lessons while reading this book. Instead, I've spent many hours discussing these concepts with Black. We've talked about being servants and ministers. We've talked about a church full of priests. We've talked about the church relying on the state. This book is a great reminder of the many discussions that I've had with my PhD mentor, and the reason that I asked him to be my mentor in the first place. Everyone reading this book will quickly realize that Black is not writing from an ivory tower. Instead, he's writing with hands covered with Ethiopian dust. This is a book that I would recommend to anyone. Read it... and share it with others... then live the pattern of life that you find in Scripture... the pattern of life in which only the Holy Spirit can direct you and empower you.”
The Myth of Adolescence
This study looks at the origins of the theory of adolescence and finds it seriously flawed. I examine the age 12 and age 30 transitions in the life of Jesus and explore what impact this has on our understanding of human development.
Will You Join the Cause of Global Missions?
Who is really supposed to go and fulfill the Great Commission? You? Me? The church in America has come to depend on professionals to "do ministry." In many churches, the pastor, paid to do the job, is the one who is expected to carry out all functions of the church. But it was not always this way. Instead of looking for professionals to do the ministry while the rest of us fill the pews, I point us back to the Gospel Commission and the call on every Christian life to fulfill that Commission.

Review (from Amazon):
“I encourage you to get your hands on this brief, but challenging book by Brother Dave. The heart of God’s revealed word is the gospel of Jesus Christ, inseparable from that is the call to make His name known to the lost and dying world. You--that's who God has chosen to be the tool of his great and powerful Spirit in evangelism of your Judea, your Samaria, and as God enables, the ends of your earth. Dave addresses missions as the calling of every believer, shows how the mundane and simple obedient life is a part of God’s means for reaching others, and contrasts the American dream we all drift toward with the lifestyle Jesus said it would take to follow him and love others. Dave challenges us to consider the global need and global work for Jesus, not as work for "a professional" but for each and every one of us. Dave is a man who lives this out. God laid down his life that we would know him, and he's called you to be a part of completing His work on earth. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”
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Interviews





  • Abidan Paul Shah, Hoi Polloi Podcast, Dr. David Alan Black, an interview about It's All Greek to Me: Confessions of an Unlikely Academic 
  • Abidan Paul Shah, Hoi Polloi Podcast, Dr. David Alan Black, an interview about Why Four Gospels: The Historical Origins of the Gospels
  • Michael James Gordon, Messiah Community Radio Talk Show, Dr. David Alan Black, an interview: Have You Ever Tried to Learn Biblical Greek? 
  • Abidan Paul Shah, Hoi Polloi Podcast, Dr. David Alan Black, an interview about New Testament textual criticism
  • Henry Neufeld of Energion Publications interviewed Dr. David Alan Black about his book Seven Marks of a New Testament Church.


  • Henry Neufeld of Energion Publications interviewed Dr. David Alan Black about his book It's All Greek to Me: Confessions of an Unlikely Academic.


  • Henry Neufeld of Energion Publications interviewed Dr. David Alan Black about his book Why Four Gospels? The Historical Origins of the Gospels.


  • Henry Neufeld of Energion Publications interviewed Dr. David Alan Black about his book Will You Join the Cause of Global Missions?



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DBO Essays about Greek

The Permutations of “Jesus Loves John” in Greek
This is an incomplete list of 96 permutations of "Jesus Loves John" in Greek. It serves as an example of the flexibility available within the Greek language. 
Ten Best Books for Studying New Testament Greek
"How do I move from my current knowledge of Greek to a greater understanding of the languages?" Here are 10 resources that will be instrumental in your development.
Five Things to Do Until You Master Greek
So you’re studying New Testament Greek and finding it a bit of a challenge. A lot of people don’t stick with it. “I tried learning Greek and it didn’t work for me.” The problem may just be that you never learned persistence. Do you want to master the Greek language and be able to use it in your walk with God and in your service for Him? If you do, you will have to put forth some effort. Here are five suggestions how you can "stick with it" in a practical sense.
Confessions of a Missional Greek Prof
In this short essay, I share my heart about the one thing that is more important than anything else, namely the Great Commission. Even though I have many interests, and even though I have often voiced my criticisms of much in the church’s practical life, nothing motivates me more than being a "missional Greek prof."
Greek Student: Quo Vadis?
It's the end of your Greek semester. Exams are finished. Classes are in recess, or perhaps graduation lies right around the corner. In this short essay, I encourage students to build on the foundation they received from their studies in New Testament Greek.
Letter to My Greek Students
I wrote this short letter for my students of New Testament Greek. What's the point in teaching someone Greek? Why did you even learn all of the verbs, nouns, and principal parts? 
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Articles, Essays, and Other Works

The Peculiarities of Ephesians and the Ephesian Address
GTJ 2 (1981): 59-73.  
The Weak in Thessalonica: A Study in Pauline Lexicography
JETS 25 (1982): 307-21. 
Weakness Language in Galatians
Biblica 64 (1983): 240-42.
Paulus Infirmus: The Pauline Concept of Weakness
GTJ (1984): 77-93.
The Text of John 3:13
GTJ 6 (1985): 49-66.
Paul and Christian Unity: A Formal Analysis of Philippians 2:1-4
JETS 28 (1985): 299-308.
The Problem of the Literary Structure of Hebrews: An Evaluation and a Proposal
GTJ 7 (1986): 163-77.
Hebrews 1:1-4: A Study in Discourse Analysis
WTJ 49 (1987): 175-94.
The Translation of Matthew 5.2
Bible Translator 38 (1987): 241-43. An archived copy of the article can also be obtained through SAGE here.
A Note on the Structure of Hebrews 12,1 -2
Biblica 68 (1 987): 543-51.
Jesus on Anger: The Text of Matthew 5:22a Revisited
Novum Testamentum 30 (1988): 1 -8.
The Text of Mark 6.20
NTS 34 (1988): 141-45. The article can also be found here.
The Authorship of Philippians 2:6-11: Some Literary-Critical Observations
CTR 2 (1988): 269-89.
New Testament Semitisms
Bible Translator 39 (1988): 215-23. An archived copy can also be obtained through SAGE here.
On the Style and Significance of John 17
CTR 3 (1988): 141-59.
Some Dissenting Notes on R. Stein’s The Synoptic Problem and Markan ‘Errors’
Filologia Neotestamentaria 1 (1988): 95-101.
The Pauline Love Command: Structure, Style, and Ethics in Romans 12:9-21
Filologia Neotestamentaria 2 (1989): 3-22.
Conjectural Emendations in the Gospel of Matthew
Novum Testamentum 31 (1989): 1-15.
Remarks on the Translation of Matthew 7:14
Filologia Neotestamentaria 2 (1989): 193-195.
Blood
In Mercer Dictionary of the Bible (Macon, GA: Mercer, 1990).
Food Offered to Idols
In Mercer Dictionary of the Bible (Macon, GA: Mercer, 1990).
Luke the Physician
In Mercer Dictionary of the Bible (Macon, GA: Mercer, 1990).
Trinity
In Mercer Dictionary of the Bible (Macon, GA: Mercer, 1990).
The Study of New Testament Greek in the Light of Ancient and Modern Linguistics
In New Testament Criticism and Interpretation (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1991).
El Grupo de Juan. Helenismo y Gnosis
In Origenes del Cristianismo (Cordoba: Ediciones El Almendro, 1991).
Dreams
Taken from Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels edited by Joel B. Green, Jeannine K. Brown and Nicholas Perrin. Copyright (c) 2013 by InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used by permission of InterVarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove  IL  60515-1426.www.ivpress.com 
The Unity and Variety of the Bible
In Holman Bible Handbook (Nashville: Holman, 1992).
On Translating New Testament Poetry
In Scribes and Scripture: New Testament Essays in Honor of J. Harold Greenlee (Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 1992).
Weakness
Taken from Dictionary of Paul and His Letters edited by Gerald F. Hawthorne, Ralph P. Martin and Daniel G. Reid. Copyright (c) 1993 InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used by permission of InterVarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove  IL  60515-1426.www.ivpress.com
Textual Criticism of the New Testament
In Foundations for Biblical Interpretation (Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 1994). 
Discourse Analysis, Synoptic Criticism, and the Problem of Markan Grammar: Some Methodological Considerations
In Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation (Nashville: Broadman, 1992).
Literary Artistry in the Epistle to the Hebrews
Filologia Neotestamentaria 7 (1994): 43-52.
Section Headings in Philippians
Notes on Translation 8 (1994): 27-33.
The Discourse Structure of Philippians: A Study in Textlinguistics
Novum Testamentum 37 (1995): 16-49.
How Much Lettuce is There in the New Testament?
Notes on Translation 12 (1998): 16-26.
The Literary Structure of 1-2 Thessalonians
Southern Baptist Journal of Theology 3 (1999): 46-57. 
On the Pauline Authorship of Hebrews (Part 1): Overlooked Affinities between Hebrews and Paul
Faith and Mission 16 (1999): 32-51.
On the Pauline Authorship of Hebrews (Part 2): The External Evidence Reconsidered
Faith and Mission 16 (1999) 78-86.
The Historical Origins of the Gospels
Faith and Mission 18 (2000): 21-42.
The Study of New Testament Greek in the Light of Ancient and Modern Linguistics
In Interpreting the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman and Holman, 2001).
Jesus on Anger (Matthew 5,22a): A History of Recent Scholarship 
Written with Thomas W. Hudgins in  Greek, Jews, and Christians (Córdoba: Ediciones el Almendro, 2013).
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PowerPoint Presentations

The Discourse Structure of Philippians

The Medium Is the Message: Hermeneutics and Rhetorical Features in the Greek New Testament

1 John Presentation

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Complete List of Publications

Publications by David Alan Black
Here you will find a complete list of my publications up to October of 2015. It includes books that I have written or edited, chapters that I have contributed to books, books that I have had translated into other languages, journal articles, and book reviews. It is organized from older works to more recent works.